Packers fire Winston Moss after tweet shading Aaron Rodgers

The messy fallout from Mike McCarthy’s firing continues.

Days after Packers brass let go of their coach of nearly 13 seasons, a tenure that included one Super Bowl win in 2010, interim coach Joe Philbin axed assistant head coach Winston Moss on Tuesday. The decision came not long after he tweeted about leadership and accountability in Green Bay.

“Ponder this … what Championship teams have are great leadership! Period! It’s not the offensive guru trend, it’s not the safe trend. Find somebody that is going to hold #12 and everybody in this building to a #LombardiStandard! Period! #losingsucks!” Moss wrote on Tuesday afternoon.

Nine hours later, Moss provided an update: “The Packers have informed me that there letting me go. #thankstwitter!”

And added, “I have serve the Packers with all my heart and soul. I’ve given it my all. no regrets!”

Moss joined the Packers in 2006 as the linebackers coach, before being promoted to McCarthy’s assistant head coach a year later.

He isn’t the first Green Bay alum to call out the team’s quarterback. On Sunday, former Packers tight end Mark Chmura called Rodgers a “prima donna” in a scathing interview with ESPN.

“Aaron’s not going to come out of this looking good,” Chmura said. “Aaron might be happy, but Aaron, to me, looks like a prima donna basketball player in the NBA that wants his coach fired.”

Rodgers has criticized McCarthy publicly in the past, chastising the team’s game plan following its 22-0 shutout of the Bills in September.

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“We were terrible on offense,” Rodgers said. “I don’t think it made a difference for the offense. That’s what it was. It was as bad as we’ve played on offense with that many yards in a long time.”

As the Packers begin their search for the next head coach, team president Mark Murphy has already shut down talk of Rodgers playing a role in the process.

“Obviously, he’s free to provide input and talk to us,” Murphy said. “But he’s not going to be a part of the process. … The other thing I would say, Aaron was no part at all in the decision to move on from Mike.”

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